Home > My diaries > My fuckin’ cheap English skill!

My fuckin’ cheap English skill!

Since I was thirty years old, I’ve been learning English. Generally, many Japanese aren’t good at English, especially speaking. I thought it’s important for me to speak in English when I decided to start learning again.
Thinking in English, expressing my feeling in English, getting the feeling from someone else in English… because English is one of tools of communication.
But in Japan, many people think it’s important to read and listen in English, and they try too hard to get the high score on reading and listening of English tests. English tests of Japan are mainly constituted of reading and listening.
Actually, it’s also enjoyable for me to get the correct answer on the tests. People can get some confidence from the good result. To keep their motivation for learning English, confidence is one of the most important factors. But it’s not enough.
I…I…want to express my feeling deeper in English, want to feel from a lot of things wrote, spoken in English… but for now, my fuckin’ English… it’s not enough at all.

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Categories: My diaries
  1. September 28, 2009 at 5:03 am

    If you want help with your english, I’d be more than happy to help you. I’m going to set up a few posts on my blog soon aimed at helping japanese speakers with english. Of course, my intensions are not completely altruistic though, I want to better my own abilities with japanese as well. So perhaps, we could have a symbiotic exchange of knowledge. My english has been of a post-college reading level since I was 10, so you have nothing to worry about from my end. (I know more words than most dictionaries.) But I will say, I’m like a katana’s same wrap. I can mesh well with some people, but others I am extremely abrasive to. And, as you can see, I’m very prone to digression. So visit me if you wish. I would gladly assist your studies.

    • honeypotter
      September 28, 2009 at 3:23 pm

      Hello, Mr.Mugami, I’m glad that you found my blog and came.

      Wow, it’s okay with you to give some help to me? Thank you so much! I do want to know if my expressions in my blog is natural or not, in the respect of nuances. So I’d like you to leave your comment as questions if there are something strange with my phrases in English.

      I visited your blog and read your articles, by the way. As you wrote in your comment, you’re interested in Japanese culture or something? I believe we can exchange our own knowledge each other.

      Can I ask you something in your comment? The word “katana” in the 7th line of your comment, probably means…”samurai sword”? And one more thing, can I take “Mr.” off when I call you?

  2. October 3, 2009 at 5:33 am

    Yes, It was a reference to the sword. And Mr.? Oh the pain! You’re making me feel old. Onegai, no Mr. Anyways, I found your blog title hysterical. And mildly ironic. If I could make a correction to it; “My Cheap Fuckin’ English Skills.” I’m wonderingthough, Why the word ‘cheap’? If you’re refering to a lack of skill on your part, words like ‘sucky’, ‘shitty’, or ‘bad’ might be more natural choices. Also, ‘fucking’ is an intensifier of the word that follows it. So if fucking comes before cheap, it implies your stress on its ‘cheapness’. If fucking were put before english it implies your frustration with english itself more so than with your ability with it. It’s a very subtle difference. And curious fact: ‘Fuck’ comes from Proto-Indo-European ‘Fuk’ making it one of the oldest words ever spoken.

  3. October 3, 2009 at 9:07 am

    ‘Confidences’ is not actually the plural form of confidence. At least not since the 19th century. The word is more closely attached to confidante and con artist, implying knowledge of others’ secrets or the people who they are currently conning. You would call a con artist’s marks, confidences. But even that, I’ve only ever read a few times in older books. So ‘confidence’ is a singular ideal. Just use quantitative modifiers with it like; some, a little bit of, more, quite a lot of, etc.,. I hope that made sense to you.

    • honeypotter
      October 3, 2009 at 2:34 pm

      Hello, Mugami, how are you?

      Oh, thank you so much for your comment! “cheap”, “fuckin'”…Yeah, I got a mistake on lining them. How about this; “My cheaply fuckin’ English”? It would be better? “Also, ‘fucking’ is an intensifier of the word that follows it.” in your comment is so understandable. Thank you so much.

      The reason why I chose “cheap”…I have some reasons. At first, I didn’t know ‘sucky’ or ‘shitty’ at that time 😦 Second, I had suddenly imagined one meaning ‘yasui‘ in Japanese. ‘yasui‘ is often used when you can buy something with lower cost. The antonym of ‘yasui‘ is ‘takai‘(expensive). We have another usage in ‘yasui‘ for slang or something as a matter of fact. We use ‘yasui‘ in Japanese when we want to express something rubbish. For example, ‘Ore wa yasui otoko da‘(It means, I am an ordinary man, not great) or ‘Omae yasui yone, sonna kotode yorokobu nante‘(It means, you can easily feel happy with such a small thing). Anyway, you gave me better expressions this time, so I’ll use it from now on. Thank you so much 😀

      The topic about ‘confidence’ and ‘con’ is very interesting for me. Yeah, I understood that.

  4. October 4, 2009 at 10:56 am

    ‘Yasui’ is used in a much broader range than in english. The same thing with ‘kimochi’. Actually, kimochi usage is really lazy compared to english’s, ‘feeling’. Just look at this: Kimochi desu ka? To you it sounds fine but put it into english: You feeling? Feeling what? Of course I’m feeling, I’m alive! Are you asking me how I’m feeling? Or What I’m feeling? If I can feel something? My feelings on a subject? Or does something feel good? Plus it’s more common to use feeling as an active verb rather than as a passive noun. We use the word ’emotions’ for the “noun-work”. And we prefer using the type of emotion without the words emotions or feelings in the sentence. (Like: Are you angry? You look pissed. It’s nice.) I’ll do a post on my blog for kimochi vs. feeling. And cheaply is an adverb not an adjective. Thus, it implies a state of action rather than a state of being. Making ‘poorly’ and ‘hastily’ and ‘shabbily’ its synonyms and ‘superbly’ and ‘excellently’ it antonyms.

    • honeypotter
      October 4, 2009 at 5:24 pm

      Hi, Mugami, how are you?

      Ohhhhh! What you said after ‘And cheaply is an adverb…’ in your comment fit in me very much! A state of action and a state of being…I think I caught that nuance of them. I prefer to use ‘shabbily’ in the title of this article. “My shabbily fuckin’ English skill!” What do you think of it?

      I’m looking forward to reading your new article about kimochi vs feeling. 😀

  5. October 5, 2009 at 9:28 am

    Ahhh. . . You might not ever want to say the phrase, “fit in me” again. Zen zen hen da. Sore wa title, ‘ly’ words are adverbs, except ‘fly’. Adverbs modify verbs. So, no verb, no adverb. Your title doesn’t have a verb (‘fucking’ is only an intensifier here not a verb. Unless “My-san” is having bad sex with “English Skill-san”.) Wakatta? “My Shabby Fuckin’ Skills at English”, or “My Shabby Skills at Fuckin’ English”. As a sentence it would be: My English is fuckin’ shabby! (Notice I didn’t use ‘skills’.) Is the title like saying, ‘koku ja arimasen,’ because that’s how it comes across? Me, personally, I’d say, “My Fuckin’ English Blows Ass!” And for a title I’d go with, “English Skills: I Fuckin’ Ain’t Got None”. (I ain’t got none = I don’t have any. It’s an ironical slang phrase. But I’ll get into that later. . .)

    • honeypotter
      October 5, 2009 at 9:52 am

      Hi, Mugami, how are you?

      Ummm…In what you said; Zen zen hen da, I definitely can tell you zen zen is an adverb and hen is an adjective. In Japanese, Adverbs can modify adjectives like you wrote. For example, ‘hijou ni kiken na hito‘ is expressed like this; “an extremely dangerous person” in Japanese.

      Is it not unnatural that adverbs can be before adjectives in English?

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