Home > Japanese Culture > Tortoises were attracted to my whistle attracted me

Tortoises were attracted to my whistle attracted me

I have a few forerunners nationwide, such as master Kanzaki I introduced before.

Mr.Temma is one of the greatest English teachers I’ve ever met, who lives in Nishinomiya, Hyogo prefecture. He gave me one seminar on English, especialy a recitation, so I went to the place he’s going to teach.

I already wrote about that on other blog, so in this blog, I’ll introduce you other topic around Nishinomiya.

There is one famous shrine called, nishinomiya jinja, nearby the place the seminar was held. nishinomiya jinja is the head shrine of Ebisu, which is one God of happiness.

I was surprised with my ignorance about nishinomiya jinja, in which hukuotoko carnival is held. Hukuotoko, which means “lucky persons”, are the three fastest runners achieved the main shrine from the main gate. Every 10th in January, it’s called “touka-ebisu“, which is one of the events in nishinomiya jinja and many people wait the main gate open. As soon as the gate open, they start dashing toward the main shirine. The three fastest runners can get the title as the chosen one in descending order of their speed. The fastest one is ichiban huku(means “the first place of happiness”), the second one is niban huku(means “the second place of happiness”), the third one is sanban huku(means “the third place of happiness”).

Incidentally, I tried to dash on the premises like the participants do, however, I found it hard to do because I wore sandals.

This is the film introducing hukuotoko. Please check it.

These are the photos I took.

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This is the main shrine of nishinomiya jinja. It was about six o’clock in the morning, so there were only a few people praying. Residents around here seemed to took advantage of this place for jogging.

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I was surprised with this bridge. Its slope is so much that anyone can hardly walk over this bridge, I guess.

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There are many tortoises in a pond, instead of carp. There is one phrase like this in Japan; “Tsuru wa sen-nen, Kame wa man-nen” which means “Cranes can live for one thousand years, and tortoises can live for ten thousands years. Both of them are lucky things for Japanese.”.

I was surprised with these tortoises. I’ve ever seen carp in a pond gathering by clapping hands, however, I’ve never seen tortoises in a pond doing as well before. What obedient tortoises! I should have brought a piece of cabbage or something…lol

I took a film of tortoises gathering and trying to bite a leaf I’m holding.

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Categories: Japanese Culture
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